It's Always Time to "Lift Up"

Written by Leland Ping on Jan 11, 2016

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Throughout the Bible and almost exclusively in the Old Testament, the phrase, “Lift Up” is used repeatedly in a variety of ways. In the book of Psalms, the phrase is employed to illustrate our need for God, our dependence on God, and our desire to show our God our intentions to obey Him. Given that we must always consider our relationship with God, it’s always an appropriate time for us to be “lifting up.”

On many occasions, David made reference to lifting up his “soul” to the Lord. At the outset of the 25th Psalm, he writes, “To You, O Lord, I lift up my soul.” David later speaks of rejoicing because he lifted his soul to God (Psalm 86:4). And the king asked the Creator for guidance and direction as he lifted his soul to the Eternal One in Psalm 143:8. David understood that there’s a connection between the requirements of godly service and the benefits of godly service. Certainly, serving God meant rendering himself obedient and lifting himself up to a higher purpose. That meant sacrificing self for service to God and David knew that wasn’t always an easy thing to do. Yet, he understood that direction from God and true joy came as a result of his decision to do right.

The Psalmist also talked about lifting up his hands to God. David asked God to hear him when he lifted up his “hands toward [God’s] holy sanctuary” (Psalm 28:2). David says he’ll lift his hands in the name of his Lord in Psalm 63:4. And in the longest Psalm of all, the author writes the words, “My hands also I will lift up to Your commandments, which I love” (Psalm 119:48). Godly service has always required actions. Putting our hands to work for the cause of Christ is a very “right” thing to do. We ought always to lift our hands to God’s commandments and wishes, seeking to please Him and be about His business.

Finally, the psalms also make reference to lifting up our eyes to God. “I will lift up my eyes to the hills — from whence comes my help?” asked one writer. He quickly answered his own question with incredible confidence: “My help comes from the Lord, who made heaven and earth” (Psalm 121:1-2). This psalmist teaches us something that we need to be reminded of often. The powerful God who created the sky and the ground and everything we see is the same powerful God who exists today. As He has delivered us in times past so will He deliver us in the future. It’s simply “illogical” to think otherwise.

Whether our soul in reverence to God, our hands in doing His work, or our eyes in looking to Him for deliverance, it’s always a good time for us to “lift up.”

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